04 Feb Vishnu as Vishvarupa (cosmic or universal man), watercolour on paper, Jaipur, India, ca. 1800-1820.
This striking painting shows the blue-skinned Hindu god Vishnu in the form of the Universal Man or Vishvarupa. The small figures painted on his body refer to his role as encompassing all of creation. He has four arms, each holding one of Vishnu’s attributes; a conch shell, a lotus flower, a mace and the circular weapon called Sudarshana chakra (meaning ‘beautiful discus’). - vam.ac.uk

Vishnu as Vishvarupa (cosmic or universal man), watercolour on paper, Jaipur, India, ca. 1800-1820.

This striking painting shows the blue-skinned Hindu god Vishnu in the form of the Universal Man or Vishvarupa. The small figures painted on his body refer to his role as encompassing all of creation. He has four arms, each holding one of Vishnu’s attributes; a conch shell, a lotus flower, a mace and the circular weapon called Sudarshana chakra (meaning ‘beautiful discus’). - vam.ac.uk

02 Feb Kailasanath Temple, AD 756-774, Ellora, Maharashtra, India (by kun0me)
The Kailasanathar Temple is one of the 34 monasteries and temples, extending over more than 2 km, that were dug side by side in the wall of a high basalt cliff in the complex. Of these 34 monasteries and temples, the Kailasa is a remarkable example of Dravidian architecture account of its striking proportion, its elaborate workmanship, and its sculptural ornamentation. - wikipedia.org

Kailasanath Temple, AD 756-774, Ellora, Maharashtra, India (by kun0me)

The Kailasanathar Temple is one of the 34 monasteries and temples, extending over more than 2 km, that were dug side by side in the wall of a high basalt cliff in the complex. Of these 34 monasteries and temples, the Kailasa is a remarkable example of Dravidian architecture account of its striking proportion, its elaborate workmanship, and its sculptural ornamentation. - wikipedia.org

25 Jan The Goddess Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), 14th–15th century, Nepal. Gilt copper alloy, inlaid with semiprecious stones. 
This is one of the finest Nepali depictions of Durga known. The eighteen-armed Hindu goddess Durga, an aspect of the Great Goddess Devi, is depicted in the act of slaying the demon Mahisha. After the gods had been defeated in battle by the all-powerful Mahisha, they created Durga to serve as their champion and turned over to her their weapons. With the force of the collective might transferred by the gods to her, Durga slays the demon, who had transformed himself into a ferocious buffalo. Originally, this Durga was part of a larger ensemble. She stood on the back of the buffalo-demon, supported on a pedestal. - metmuseum.org

The Goddess Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), 14th–15th century, Nepal. Gilt copper alloy, inlaid with semiprecious stones.

This is one of the finest Nepali depictions of Durga known. The eighteen-armed Hindu goddess Durga, an aspect of the Great Goddess Devi, is depicted in the act of slaying the demon Mahisha. After the gods had been defeated in battle by the all-powerful Mahisha, they created Durga to serve as their champion and turned over to her their weapons. With the force of the collective might transferred by the gods to her, Durga slays the demon, who had transformed himself into a ferocious buffalo. Originally, this Durga was part of a larger ensemble. She stood on the back of the buffalo-demon, supported on a pedestal. - metmuseum.org

24 Jan Banteay Srei temple pediment, ca. AD 967. Banteay Srei temple, Cambodia. Sandstone 196 x 269 cm. Angkorian style (by  dalbera).
Episode from the Maha-Bharata. The two demons (asuras) Sunda and Upasunda are arguing over the apsara (watery divinity) Tilottama.

Banteay Srei temple pediment, ca. AD 967. Banteay Srei temple, Cambodia. Sandstone 196 x 269 cm. Angkorian style (by  dalbera).

Episode from the Maha-Bharata. The two demons (asuras) Sunda and Upasunda are arguing over the apsara (watery divinity) Tilottama.

22 Jan

Early 20th century temple, late Mughal style, Deshnoke (by alschim).

According to a local legend, Karni Mata, the 14th century mystic and an incarnation of Hindu goddess Durga, implored Yama, the god of death, to restore the life of the son of one of her storytellers. Yama refused, and Karni Mata incarnated the dead son and all of the storytellers as a rat, under her protection.

And by the way… aren’t these rats drinking their milk insanely cute ?